Stream Adam Curtis Documentaries on BBC iPlayer Abroad

Noah Williams
Stream Adam Curtis Documentaries on BBC iPlayer Abroad

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Our simple guide to watching Adam Curtis documentaries on BBC iPlayer from anywhere in the world

Adam Curtis’s most recent six-part documentary series Can’t Get You Out of My Head has been released straight to BBC iPlayer, where it joins an impressive selection from Curtis’s back catalogue. Available to stream now, Curtis’s latest instalment is stylistically his finest accomplishment to date. Revelling in its arthouse kudos, Curtis’s latest offering utilises par excellence his signature bricolage method of splicing together seemingly disparate narrative strands, which look to the fringes and minutia of history in what becomes an interrogation of the human condition from the analogue to the digital ages.

Curtis’s documentaries—although I’m sure cheap to make—are some of the most complex, compelling and irresistible works of art to ever grace the small screen. Unfortunately for those living overseas this treasure trove of shadowy gems is not immediately available to stream on BBC iPlayer. You’ve probably already tried accessing BBC iPlayer using a VPN or proxy link and found the results to be at best temperamental, if not downright disappointing.

Fear not, there is an alternative solution.

Here's how you can stream all available Adam Curtis content on BBC iPlayer

1. Download Chrome Browser, if you're not already using it.

2. Install Beebs.

Your web-browser, having reloaded, will now be able to stream iPlayer. This will work from anywhere overseas.

Here's a microdose of Curtis's latest doc-series Can't Get You Out of My Head

Can’t Get You Out of My Head is a rich tapestry of rare archive footage buttressed by a haunting soundtrack of subterranean pop melodies, ethereal soundscapes, and bloodcurdling drones. Those revisiting Adam Curtis’s oeuvre on BBC iPlayer will know that each instalment is its own house of mirrors, each a delve into the dark depths of the human psyche; like a post-punk David Attenborough doing anthropology on contemporary civilisation Curtis’s work offers us a critically astute psychedelic, synthesised to unpick our assumptions about free will, American housewives, West Germany and Valium.

According to Curtis his work is a “history” of feelings, a filmography of why you feel the way you do. Curtis asks why “we believe that what we feel inside us is the most important thing in the world”? And explores how this (post)modern truism has led us to be consumed by “a sense of anxiety, uncertainty and fear about the future”.

Adam Curtis interview with Simon Mayo and Mark Kermode

Curtis’s brilliance lies in his success at rendering this history of the insubstantial palpable, his assemblage of real footage and sounds lure you in while Curtis’s narrative attempts to chart what he sees as an affective stranglehold of contemporary beliefs.The best moments in Can’t Get You Out of My Head are those in which he seamlessly intersplices what appear on the surface to be disparate and unconnected historical events, in finding concourse between Maoist Opera and US suburbia, between provincial England and the drawing up of borders in the Middle East, and in explaining how these events have helped shape the interior of your mind.

Dark Mirror's Charlie Brooker is a fan

Want to watch British TV from anywhere?

Simply install the Beebs extension

Get Beebs for Chrome